Blog

Taking A Break From Activism

I keep walking by this sign in my neighborhood that someone has hung in their window. It says, “What kind of activism are YOU doing?” Just like that, with the “you” in all caps. And each time I walk by it, I have a slightly different answer.

“Triggered” and “Problematic:” Two Words That No Longer Mean Anything

This isn’t a matter of “one of these things is not like the other.” It’s more of an “each one of these things is sort of like the others, but also very much not, and for such a broad range of reasons that are now being obfuscated by vague language and shoddy critiques, many of which are made on Twitter, which was never a good platform for critical thinking to begin with.”

Girl Walks Into CVS

I buy the beef jerky and some protein bars and I stare at the little tubes of lipgloss and think, huh, capitalism, and I think about how, if you look at it closely, most of capitalism = shiny objects. I look at all the candies, the candy corn and the sour patch kids, or maybe they’re cabbages, and banana-flavored peanuts, and the light is all trickly and sterile. True or false: The virus is transmitted by light.

Girl And Her Autism

Once upon a time, there was a girl with autism who lived in a building with houseness in an area with citydom. The girl and her autism lived with her person with motherness and person with brotherness, plus two animals with ferretness. Often, the girl with autism called the person with motherness “Mother,” but we will not do that, because we know that a person with motherness is far more than just her motherness, and she must not let her motherness define her.

Reading Between the Lines of Mental Health Advocacy

Last week, I published an op-ed in the Stanford Daily criticizing Stanford’s Mental Health Week this January and pointing out the ways in which this particular campaign failed to meet the needs of students with serious mental illness. In this post, I want to elaborate on how I interpreted some of the campaign’s specific messages…

Would You Rather

The idea that happiness is an ideal state + the belief that one can choose happiness + the notion that happiness is the opposite of illness = blaming people with mental illness + minimizing said illness.

The Game

They laugh at you when you don’t know how to do something. They laugh at you when you try to learn. You quite literally cannot win.